Councilman warns female opponent that job ‘takes a whole lot of your time’

District 10 City Councilman Mike Gallagher told his opponent, who's a mom with two kids, "You do realize that being on Council takes a whole lot of your time. Are you ready for that?"

City Councilman Mike Gallagher’s opponent in the upcoming municipal election says that after seeing her two children, he warned her that serving on the city council “takes a whole lot of your time.”

In a campaign email sent out by District 10 candidate Celeste Montez Tidwell, she recalls her encounter with Gallagher on March 2 when council candidates drew lots for their place on the May 9 ballot.

On March 2nd, my son Boston drew a place on the ballot for me, so that I can have the opportunity to serve you on the San Antonio City Council. Since it is Women’s History Month, I thought it would be special to take my daughter, Portland, so she can gain a better understanding of the political process. I even introduced my children to the current Councilman, my opponent. As he was shaking my hand he looked at my children and said, “You do realize that being on Council takes a whole lot of your time. Are you ready for that?” My daughter’s jaw dropped. I responded, “Yes! Women have been multitasking for centuries.” As I walked away with my children, my daughter Portland asked, “Mommy, does the Councilman think you are dumb?” I looked her in the eye and said, “Don’t ever let a man tell you what you can and can not do.”

This is the second time Tidwell has run for the District 10 office. In 2013, she was endorsed by the Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio. She attended this year’s endorsement forum on March 22 but Stonewall members decided not to make an endorsement in that district.

Gallagher did not attend the Stonewall forum nor did he submit a candidate questionnaire.

Celeste Montez Tidwell with her daughter.

Celeste Montez Tidwell with her daughter.

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